Dealing with Seasickness

Jack would get sick just reading in a car, so when he came sailing with us in Sardinia he had several tricks up his sleeve. His primary weapon against seasickness was the pressure strap on his wrist. We were highly sceptical but it seemed to work wonderfully. Next was helm time, and many swear by this, which looked to help. Maybe it’s the focus. Finally, after 3 days most people get their sea legs and seasickness goes away. We heard ginger also helps.  

Here’s what our followers recommended:

Keeping Active

  • e_e_flanders I’ve read motion sickness is a disconnect between your brain & legs. Your brain expects your legs to be moving to cause all that motion. So walking in place is supposed to help.
  • vickiarbitrio First 24 hours in the ocean I need to drive or sleep–if racing and mesmerized by sail trim or looking for puffs, I’ll be okay.
  • alba Having something important to do will take your focus off the motion. Also, try not to fill your stomach, only sips of water, no big meals, no stimulants, booze, cigarettes and coffee are a big no no if you are sensitive to seasickness.

Stay Outside, Look to the Horizon

  • vitormac If any crewmates get sick, or put in the cockpit looking out of the boat, because nausea comes from the labyrinths where the eyes see different movements of what the brain registers …. if it does not work is to enter the water that heals immediately 😉
  • aleksjoey Look at the horizon where sea meets sky
  • science_kat I’ve only ever been seasick once and it was on a big cruise boat where I was stuck inside with no fresh air. Fresh air and ginger chews worked a charm.
  • christysverreartheads Keep eyes on horizon for sure

Wrist Pressure Bands

  • delamonicamilla Not drinking a lot of liquids, eating green apple…but for me what works better is the sea band…

Ginger

  • 403natasha I’m a yachtie with seasickness 😂 my tricks – ginger everything, chewing gum/mints. Sipping water with BCAAs. If you’re able… jump in the water when you feel you’re starting to get nauseous (works every time). And if you’re Canadian – gravol has a ginger lozenge that doesn’t make you sleepy and works wonders
  • philmason69 Ginger tablets (we use the Blackmores ones)

Vitamins and Drugs

  • mark_delio Trans derm scop ,, patch behind ear.
  • sunbonoo Biodramina C tablets are very helpful as well, at least if you’re just going on a short boat trip.
  • char_loves_chad An ear plug in your non dominant ear. Levels out equaliberium (sp?). Bonine is great and MotionEze drops behind your ears
  • mocruisinglife Vitamin c and avoid heavy weather

 Diet 

  • instafizzywine Salty anchovies… ancient mariner remedy. Waistbands and transderm work too.. But anchovies taste better 😊
  • missconsea Nibble saltines, sip ginger ale, don’t get mesmerized by the swell and my fav, naps.
  • me_green I’ve heard chewing gum helps
  • emilelakey Strawberry jam!!!
  • lamarlanre Rarely seasick but I go out on an empty stomach
  • systellapolaris Eating anything BEFORE you go out to the sea. I get less seasick when I don’t have an empty stomack. Sanna

 Other suggestions

  • antonioemachado Some fishermen here in Brazil cut a lemon in half and smell it for a while. Never saw if it works though. Thankfully I’m rarely seasick.
  • kerstinapril Natural herbal remedy works every time ✌🏼🍁⛵️
  • langford99 Rum. If that doesn’t work more rum.

 

We will be resorting to the first five, in that order as required – helm time and staying active, staying outside and looking out to the horizon, and if that fails using the wrist pressure bands, then ginger, and when all that fails, drugs (and rum) as a last resort*.

 

*We once sailed in the Cyclades with a crew member prone to seasickness. By the 3rd day of large waves coming from all directions he had enough and took some sea sickness pills. He was knocked out and slept through the worst of 6 metre waves heading into Mykonos. Not the kind of thing  you can afford to happen when you’re trying to stay on top of the waves.

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